Wellness Philosophy

Health and wellness is a multifaceted journey, a unique and ever-evolving experience for each individual. The Barnes Center at The Arch team approaches health and wellness holistically, encompassing mind, body, spirit and community. Our services and resources are organized placing individual student needs forefront.

No matter where a student engages with the Barnes Center, they are empowered and encouraged to Be Well in the way that best meets their needs.

Dimensions of Wellness

Throughout a student’s holistic health and wellness journey, the Barnes Center at The Arch encourages the exploration of resources, services and more that all weave together the Dimensions of Wellness. Discover the Dimensions of Wellness below and the Barnes Center Wellness Wheel on YouTube.

As a guiding compass, the Dimensions of Wellness play an integral role in the Wellness Leadership Institute workshop series.

Career Wellness involves finding fulfillment and balance from your work and academic life.

Examples

  • Experiencing mentorship, internship and employment opportunities.
  • Expanding professional skills and knowledge.
  • Learning from peers and colleagues.

Syracuse University Resources

As the core of the Wellness Wheel, Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Accessibility, intersects with all eight Dimensions of Wellness. Wellness is impacted by systemic health and equities that create barriers to accessing care and health education services. Systemic health inequities have been historically known to impact individuals in our communities based on their ability, status, age, ethnicity or national origin, gender identity, immigration status, mental health status, recovery status, race, religion, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and veteran or military status. The Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Accessibility core acknowledges that we cannot look at holistic well-being without acknowledging systems of oppression and health inequities that exist and interact with each Dimension of Wellness.

Examples

  • Developing an understanding of diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility.
  • Enhancing understanding of health inequities, such as COVID-19 disproportionately impacting People of Color.
  • Learning what is bias, and how to report instances at Syracuse University.
  • Understanding the impact that marginalization and discrimination has on well-being.

Syracuse University Resources

Emotional Wellness is about being aware of and accepting our own feelings and the feelings of others. This helps us cope with stress, life challenges and decision-making.

Examples

  • Learning to cope with “ups and downs.”
  • Learning stress management techniques.
  • Managing emotions.
  • Understanding when you need to ask for help, available resources and who you can go to.

Syracuse University Resources

Environmental Wellness is about the spaces that you live, work and play in. More specifically, it can be anything from how clean or organized your room is, how you feel about the Syracuse University campus or even the weather.

Examples

  • Attending trainings that over time can bring about a sense of larger community change (e.g. Narcan and Opioid Training).
  • Policy change and social change.
  • Understanding the impact of climate change and a healthy environment on well-being.

Syracuse University Resources

Highlighting the importance of the short-term and long-term, Financial Wellness is about understanding and learning how to manage personal financial situations.

Examples

  • Developing an understanding of the importance of building credit and credit card basics.
  • Learning about banking, budgeting and financial goal setting.
  • Learning how to create healthy meals on a budget.
  • Setting realistic goals to meet monetary needs.
  • Understanding how to complete your tax return.

Syracuse University Resources

Intellectual Wellness involves learning new things and finding opportunities to grow personally and with others, while being open-minded to learn about new ideas or different perspectives and continuing to develop your knowledge.

Examples

  • Connecting with your academic advisor to explore additional learning opportunities, support resources and more.
  • Develop skills such as organizing, prioritizing, combating procrastination and using technology efficiently.
  • Explore cuisines, food customs, nutrition guidance and eating patterns around the globe as it relates to nutrition.
  • Learn about library resources, services and tools that can support your well-being and personal interests, including fiction and cookbooks, streaming video collections, and online tools for learning new skills.

Syracuse University Resources

Physical Wellness is about keeping your body healthy and could include nutrition, sleeping and exercise habits. Physical well-being can also be impacted by stress levels, alcohol and other substances.

Examples

  • How to recognize and respond to alcohol poisoning.
  • Learning about alcohol and drug use.
  • Limiting harmful behaviors that can contribute to poor physical health such as alcohol and drug use.
  • Maintaining a healthy body through good nutrition, exercise, time and sleep management.
  • Strategies for safer alcohol use.
  • Understanding good nutrition through learning how to nourish your body through simple, tasty, meals and snacks.

Syracuse University Resources

Social Wellness is about making friends and connections that you can be yourself with and that add value to your life. Additionally, it includes a feeling of belonging, having people that support you and that you can support.

Examples

  • Building healthy relationships.
  • Developing a sense of belonging.
  • Having spaces where you can be your authentic self.

Syracuse University Resources

Spiritual Wellness involves defining your personal values, beliefs and how they impact your actions.

Examples

  • Developing and following core beliefs and values that align with your actions or decisions.
  • Practicing a religion.
  • Volunteer work.

Syracuse University Resources